Truth

“We live in a world where we are taught from the start that we are thinking creatures that feel. The truth is, we are feeling creatures that think.”

[JILL BOLTE TAYLOR, neuroanatomist]

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Kate Spade Saturday’s Digital Signage


Kate Spade reinvented some of its retail spaces when it rolled out iPad signage for its Kate Spade Saturday stores. The Saturday line is the more affordable and casual line of the brand. The Tokyo stores are the first to get these new displays, and New York is to follow.

The iPads will display information about nearby products such as videos, marketing messages, style suggestions and most interestingly, user-generated images to encourage customer engagement. The project was spearheaded by New York City tech design firm, the Control Group.

This move is innovative for multiple reasons. The iPads can replace mannequins and allow for store managers to update in-store displays more easily and frequently, and without disturbing the sales floor. Consumers who normally search for fashion inspiration and plan outfits online can now do it in a retail environment.

From an efficiency standpoint, if Kate Spade wants to promote a particular item globally, it can now do so by simply updating their iPads across all of their stores. The digital display capability will allow managers to measure the results of their displays faster. They can see the impact of sales corresponding with a change in display.

I am impressed with Kate Spade’s ingenuity and surprised that more fashion stores haven’t done this already. Gathering customer tastes and preferences in real-time has great potential and I can’t wait to check out a store in person once this is rolled out in NYC.

My time at Asia Society

I wanted to regularly update this blog with my internship experience, but classes and working have kept me so busy that my very first design internship has already come to an end, and this is my first post about it!

My six month internship at Asia Society of New York started last September and ended last month. As part of the Marketing & Design department, I worked on designing both print (advertisements, invitations, signage, and web banners) and digital (web banners, exhibition websites) collateral for exhibitions, events, and gift shop promotions. I also got to indulge my inner-photographer when I was asked to take pictures a few exhibitions to submit to the press (including the New York Times!). Everyone in the department was friendly, especially the talented designer who I worked under. It was extremely gratifying to see my work on display and sent out in the world.  And I absolutely loved working in an environment surrounded by art and culture. How many people can check out Buddhist sculptures from the 4th century BCE during their lunch break?

During my time here, I learned how to create and carry out a a cohesive brand identity across different media, spaces and sizes. A new exhibition opening required designing everything from small dinner invitations, large window signage, and even bigger (eight feet long!) fabric banners that were hung high up at the Park Avenue entrance. Part of the design process included collaborating with the exhibition designers to collaborate on colors and typefaces. I accompanied the designer on press checks where I picked up a lot of useful information on proofing and color management, that is going to be very helpful for my classes. It was these types of real-world experiences that I really appreciated, because up until then, I had only done design work for school. Some of the work I did fo the Asia Society can be found on my portfolio.

My thoughts on career-related matters next…